Rising male unemployment a national disgrace

Submitted by Editor on Mon, 17/04/2006 - 22:56

Comment - Alan Barron, convenor,
What the below figures reveal is that all affirmative action program for women be immediately disbanded and that the Office of Women's Affairs also be retired. It is men who are being left behind in the employment stakes. This is partly due to males being marginalized in our educational system and pushed aside by quotes for women at tertiary institutions.

Enough is enough. It's time men pulled their collective heads out of the sand and demanded justice for themselves. Women are taking over the workplace as the nation's family life begins to unravel. What does this nation need? It needs more working women like it needs a hole in the head. If we are to arrest rising male unemployment levels, the declining birthrate and rising divorce rate, then ways must be found to entice women out of the workplace and back into the home.

From: "Alan Barron" zwingli at iprimus.com.au
www.memucan.net

Date: 17/04/06

How men are being pushed aside in employment
Revealed: a nation of drop-outs,

By Tim Colebatch, Canberra, April 17, 2006

A growing underclass of jobless males is becoming entrenched in Australian society, according to Bureau of Statistics figures. Almost 250,000 men aged 25 to 44 are no longer looking for work, more than three times as many as a generation ago.

Figures reveal that while female employment has boomed in the past 25 years, the number of men without a job in the prime of their lives has soared. In 1978, more than 90 per cent of men aged 25 to 44 had a full-time job. In the 12 months to March, that proportion dropped to 81 per cent. The number in part-time jobs jumped from 2 to 7 per cent, while those with no job at all jumped from 7 to 12 per cent.

The sharpest growth has been in those not looking for work. From just under 4 per cent of prime-aged males in 1978, they jumped to 7 per cent in 1995-96, and have kept rising to almost 9 per cent now - a quarter of a million men on the sidelines.

Other Government figures suggest almost half are living on disability pensions, which pay a higher rate than the jobless benefit, do not require recipients to look for work and offer more security against being thrown off benefits.

In 2004, official figures showed 698,000 people living on disability benefits, of whom 114,000 were men aged 25 to 44. They include people assessed as suffering mental or physical disorders that prevent them holding a full-time job. The Government last year changed the rules so that new applicants capable of working part-time will be put on jobless (Newstart) benefits, but those already on disability support will be allowed to remain there.

The St Vincent de Paul Society called on the Government to offer those on low incomes "a vision of hope" and adequate income support rather than forcing people on welfare to move "out of the frying pan and into the fire".

"It's all very well to get the welfare rolls down, but these are real people involved," the society's director of social policy, John Falzon, said yesterday. "What Vinnies is concerned about is that the cohort of people who are at the very bottom is going to grow. Already we are seeing a phenomenon that is new to Australia - the growth of the working poor."

In 2004, official figures showed 698,000 people living on disability benefits, of whom 114,000 were men aged 25 to 44. They include people assessed as suffering mental or physical disorders that prevent them holding a full-time job. The Government last year changed the rules so that new applicants capable of working part-time will be put on jobless (Newstart) benefits, but those already on disability support will be allowed to remain there.

The St Vincent de Paul Society called on the Government to offer those on low incomes "a vision of hope" and adequate income support rather than forcing people on welfare to move "out of the frying pan and into the fire".

"It's all very well to get the welfare rolls down, but these are real people involved," the society's director of social policy, John Falzon, said yesterday. "What Vinnies is concerned about is that the cohort of people who are at the very bottom is going to grow. Already we are seeing a phenomenon that is new to Australia - the growth of the working poor."

Andrew McCallum, past president of the Australian Council of Social Service, said the figures reflected the costs of casualising the workforce, which discouraged young people from committing to careers and led more of them to drop out.

"These are people who have not grown up with the idea of a job for life," Mr McCallum said. "They look at everything in bite-sized chunks, because what they're offered is not secure jobs, but cameo performances. Employers don't hire people any more, they hire skills. They want to buy the skills they need at a particular time, off the shelf, ready for the task, then fire them when they're no longer needed. They don't want to invest in people."

A Bureau of Statistics survey last year found few of the men staying at home were doing so to bring up children. Only one in 30 said they were staying home to raise children. Almost 40 per cent of men at home said they were disabled, injured or ill. About one in four said they were studying, and another one in four said they were looking after the house or a relative.

In recent years, the bureau has tracked a revolution in attitudes to older workers. The proportion of men who keep on working in their late 50s and 60s is now at the highest levels in a generation, while the proportion of older women staying on at work has doubled in a generation. Most women now remain in the workforce until at least 60. Of the 4 million jobs added to the economy since 1978, 2.35 million have gone to women.

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Child Support and working Dads

Submitted by Anonymous on Wed, 26/04/2006 - 14:40.

Working Dads who were happy supporting families before Mum decided the grass was greener on the other side, have found themselves unable to keep the job they were happy with, because of an unfair CSA assessment formula that places a huge financial burden on them.

The simple way out is to quit the workforce?

Men Unemployment

Submitted by Anonymous on Sat, 22/04/2006 - 07:51.

Loss of traditional manufacturing jobs to cheaper labour means that the opportunities are in services and facilitation which require organised administrative skills. Woman have been trained from an early age to be organised and to serve, men to blow up their bellies drinking beer in front of the telly.

Men and Unemployment -Some thoughts

Submitted by Anonymous on Fri, 21/04/2006 - 23:36.

Statistics also show that a woman is being paid 85% of what a man would earn for exactly the same job. Include child care costs in the equasion as well.
More women are working over the age of 40 because of the greying of the population.
Statistics also show that a large percentage of the individuals that live on the poverty line are women, either single parents, retirees, widows.
Considering that women earn 85% of what men do, their superannuation is of course effected..
Australia is listed as number 10 in countries with gender inequality of wages and salary. (United Nations)
Women used to work in industries that are considered 'feminine' industries such as admin, cleaning, social services. But that is changing they are turning to more 'untraditional' areas in direct competition to men.
If men want jobs, get up and get them.

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